post haste

Hello everyone; yes, once again it is I, Chess the purebred border collie, filling in for the guy I live with, and here to make a quick post before our internet goes out again. You may remember me from such posts as “While We Were Away”, which was also about having no internet, and being rather spoiled by such a technological marvel.

Here I am in a characteristic pose. I’m thinking about not having any internet, of course. 14091506Not much has been happening here, except for my “picky eating”, which the guy I live with has had to deal with, but the weather has been nice, and so have my walks, so I don’t see why he’s complaining.

There are crocuses blooming. I think I already showed Crocus hadriaticus var. lilacinus, but why not show it again?14091001aAnd Crocus kotschyanus HKEP 9317 (collectors’ numbers).14091501Colchicum ‘Violet Queen’. I think.14091505Aster novae-angliae ‘Chilly Winds’. A nice white one. We’re pretending no one has changed the name of North American asters to something horrible. This plant came from Seneca Hill Perennials, alas, no more, as they say across the Atlantic.

We don’t grow the novi-belgii types since they get covered with gross mildew. 14091503Aster oblongifolius ‘October Skies’.14091502Aster ericoides ‘Pink Cloud’. It fell over, but is covered with honeybees. 14091509And the cowpen daisy, Verbesina encelioides. An annual. Slight chocolate smell to the flowers. 14091508Well, I guess that’s it. Just wanted to show some flowers blooming here, before our internet goes out again.

I don’t care that much, to tell the truth.14091507

 

Until next time, then.

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11 Responses to post haste

  1. Deborah S. Farrell says:

    Mmm! chocolate scented flowers! Wish I had smell-o-vision (Google? Are you listening?)

    I hope both the eating and the internet service are consistent from now on.

    • paridevita says:

      Not as chocolate as Berlandiera lyrata by any means; more chocolately like Helianthus maximilianii, and other daisies. I ate this morning, but of course had to give the guy I live with a lot of trouble about it. The internet is off and on. More on than off. Repair person scheduled for Thursday. The weather here has been so nice is almost alarming. What could be next? Nice weather for a whole month? The guy I live with says that then he won’t have any excuses not to work in the garden.

  2. Vivian says:

    WHAT?? North American asters aren’t asters any more? Why was I not informed? The ChillyWinds look like snowflakes, perish the thought. But they are very pretty.

    The Brooklyn Botanical Garden has a scent garden with chocolate-smelling flowers but I remember them as chrysanthemum-like and mauve. The scent garden was planted in raised beds and each specimen was isolated from the other. I had a romantic notion that a scent garden was one where the gardener had curated plants so their aromas would blend together like a perfume. the closest I’ve come to that was in a small rose garden in New Orleans and in almost any herb garden in the rain.

    I do hope that your “picky” eating is evidence of a back-to-normal pure bred border collie’s well-tempered epicureanism.

    • paridevita says:

      Symphyotrichum, they call them now. Or Machaeranthera, or Dieteria, or Eurybia, depending on, well, something. Changing all the names is of course a disaster. (Pause for effect.) We call them asters here. There could be things like scent gardens; scent carries better in more humid air, so the only one that really chocolates up the place is Berlandiera lyrata. Not called “chocolate flower” for nothing. There is the chocolate cosmos, too, but not really hardy here. I understand that I have to go to the Bad Place to get stuck with needles today. “Merely a routine test”, says the person NOT being stuck with needles.

  3. Our Chess is back! at least as conveyed by your portrait photos, dear dog. Are all your beautiful, colorful flowers in one space in the garden, Chess, or scattered throughout? We have a blue aster, currently blooming. In fact, aster is our default ground cover. When we moved in thirty years ago we bought from the Metropolitan Museum of Art a Monet seed box they sold at that time. Gratifying results with rosy pink cosmos and tall, white nicotiana, yellow coleanthus. The ones that have stayed around – stood the test of time, hehheh – are the orange and the golden nasturtiums and blue asters everywhere. I wonder how Monet dealt with the latter’s spread. No rose enters my garden if it is without scent. We’ve potted a camphor tree – large pot – because after a rain it emits a clean fresh smell. I’d love a eucalyptus citradora, but it too would have to be potted and I can’t yet bring myself to so confine one. May you have happy routine results, Chess, from your routine test. After the needle sticks, you know, you shall have your reward.

    • paridevita says:

      Thanks; I think we got our internet fixed, too. The guy I live with met a friendly technician working at the box down the street, when he drove by it, and the tech thought he knew what the trouble was. The guy I live with did the same job years ago so they had something in common. We have salvias (mostly greggii types), agastaches, asters, sphaeralceas, crocus, cyclamen, colchicums, sunflowers, etc., blooming all over the garden. The garden here is oriented toward spring and autumn, mostly, with kind of a lull in the summer. I’m back from being stuck with needles. I was told it was to check the levels of zonisamide, to see if I’m getting the protection (from seizures) that I need, and also just a general blood test thing. I also got my toenails clipped expertly. The guy I live with said my front feet looked like a cross between a border collie and a velociraptor. And now they look normal. I got a little bit to eat when I came home, so as not to spoil my dinner. (I don’t see how that works.)

  4. Our Chess is back! at least as conveyed by your portrait photos, dear dog. Are all your beautiful flowers in one space in the garden, Chess, or scattered throughout? We have a blue aster, currently blooming. In fact, aster is our default ground cover. When we moved in thirty years ago we bought from the Metropolitan Museum of Art a Monet seed box they sold at that time. Gratifying results with rosy pink cosmos and tall, white nicotiana, yellow coleanthus. The ones that have stayed around – stood the test of time, hehheh – are the orange and the golden nasturtiums and blue asters everywhere. I wonder how Monet dealt with the latter’s spread. No rose enters my garden if it is without scent. We’ve potted a camphor tree – large pot – because after a rain it emits a clean fresh smell. I’d love a eucalyptus citradora, but it too would have to be potted and I can’t yet bring myself to so confine one. May you have happy routine results, Chess, from your routine test. After the needle sticks, you know you shall have your reward.

  5. That’s funny about your toes (in comments). Good news about your internet. Shocking news about the aster name change.

    • paridevita says:

      Internet is nice to have. When email first appeared, the guy I live with got a few friends that way, and my mommy saw how cool it was, and eventually wound up with a number of online friends whom she’d never met. The aster name changes are something else. We still say aster around here, because people might stare at us if we said symphyotrichum. Oh, by the way, the Aster ericoides isn’t Pink Cloud, it’s Ringdove.

  6. Knicky Twigs says:

    So glad you’re back!

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